Contact REDIH

Ms. Terri van Gulik
REDIH Coordinator


Funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Human Development, Child and Youth Health


REDIH is a training program for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows across institutions in Quebec and Ontario, including:

  1. Queen's University
  2. University of Toronto
  3. National Research Council, Ottawa
  4. Laval University
  5. McGill University
  6. McMaster University
  7. University of Montreal
  8. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
  9. University of Ottawa
  10. University of Western Ontario
  11. Children's Health Research Institute, London
  12. Health Canada

REDIH provides scholarships and additional specific training opportunities for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows with an interest in research in reproductive health, early development, and the origins of disease in offspring.

REDIH Mentors are researchers in basic biomedical, clinical, population health, education, and ethics whose research is on very early development and how perturbations during gametogenesis, embryogenesis, and fetal development affect both health during development and the long-term health of offspring.

A wide variety of research methodologies are encompassed by REDIH, including basic biomedical research, clinical research, clinical epidemiology, ethics research, knowledge translation, and research on evaluating the success of teaching strategies.

Key emphases of REDIH are on infertility and assisted reproduction technologies (ART), widely used in treating human infertility, the effectiveness and safety of emerging technologies, fertility preservation, and the effects of the environment on reproductive health and early development.


To provide improved and expanded opportunities for research training in reproduction and early development for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have demonstrated academic excellence.

To build research, clinical, regulatory, decision-making, and industry capacity in the field of reproductive health and early development, particularly related to the origins of disease, in Canada.